10 Keys To Writing A Speech

“This is my time.”

1

That attitude will kill a speech every time.
You’ve probably sat through some lousy speeches. Despite the speakers’ renown, you eventually tuned them out over their self-indulgent tangents and pointless details. You understood something these speakers apparently didn’t: This was your time. They were just guests. And your attention was strictly voluntary.

Of course, you’ll probably deliver that speech someday. And you’ll believe your speech will be different. You’ll think, “I have so many important points to make.” And you’ll presume that your presence and ingenuity will dazzle the audience. Let me give you a reality check: Your audience will remember more about who sat with them than anything you say. Even if your best lines would’ve made Churchill envious, some listeners will still fiddle with their smart phones.

In writing a speech, you have two objectives: Making a good impression and leaving your audience with two or three takeaways. The rest is just entertainment. How can you make those crucial points? Consider these strategies:

1) Be Memorable: Sounds easy in theory. Of course, it takes discipline and imagination to pull it off. Many times, an audience may only remember a single line. For example, John F. Kennedy is best known for this declaration in his 1961 inaugural address: “And so, my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you; ask what can do for your country.” Technically, the line itself uses contrast to grab attention. More important, it encapsulated the main point of Kennedy’s speech: We must sublimate ourselves and serve to achieve the greater good. So follow Kennedy’s example: Condense your theme into a 15-20 word epigram and build everything around it top-to-bottom.
There are other rhetorical devices that leave an impression. For example, Ronald Reagan referred to America as “a shining city on the hill” in speeches. The image evoked religious heritage, freedom, and promise. And listeners associated those sentiments with Reagan’s message. Conversely, speakers can defy their audience’s expectations to get notice. In the movie Say Anything, the valedictorian undercut the canned optimism of high school graduation speeches with two words: “Go back.” In doing so, she left her audience speechless…for a moment, at least.
Metaphors…Analogies…Surprise…Axioms. They all work. You just need to build up to them…and place them in the best spot (preferably near the end).

2) Have a Structure: Think back on a terrible speech. What caused you to lose interest? Chances are, the speaker veered off a logical path. Years ago, our CEO spoke at our national meeting. He started, promisingly enough, by outlining the roots of the 2008 financial collapse. Halfway through those bullet points, he jumped to emerging markets in Vietnam and Brazil. Then, he drifted off to 19th century economic theory. By the time he closed, our CEO had made two points: He needed ADD medication – and a professional speechwriter!

Audiences expect two things from a speaker: A path and a destination. They want to know where you’re going and why. So set the expectation near your opening on what you’ll be covering. As you write and revise, focus on structuring and simplifying. Remove anything that’s extraneous, contradictory, or confusing. Remember: If it doesn’t help you get your core message across, drop it.

3) Don’t Waste the Opening: Too often, speakers squander the time when their audience is most receptive: The opening. Sure, speakers have people to thank. Some probably need time to get comfortable on stage. In the meantime, the audience silently suffers.

When you write, come out swinging. Share a shocking fact or statistic. Tell a humorous anecdote related to your big idea. Open with a question – and have your audience raise their hands. Get your listeners engaged early. And keep the preliminaries short. You’re already losing audience members every minute you talk. Capitalize on the goodwill and momentum you’ll enjoy in your earliest moments on stage.

4) Strike the Right Tone: Who is my audience? Why are they here? And what do they want? Those are questions you must answer before you even touch the keyboard. Writing a speech involves meeting the expectations of others, whether it’s to inform, motivate, entertain, or even challenge. To do this, you must adopt the right tone.
Look at your message. Does it fit with the spirit of the event? Will it draw out the best in people? Here’s a bit of advice: If you’re speaking in a professional setting, focus on being upbeat and uplifting. There’s less risk. Poet Maya Angelou once noted, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Even if your audience forgets everything you said, consider your speech a success if they leave with a smile and a greater sense of hope and purpose. That’s a message in itself. And it’s one they’ll share.

5) Humanize Yourself: You and your message are one-and-the-same. If your audience doesn’t buy into you, they’ll resist your message too. It’s that simple. No doubt, your body language and delivery will leave the biggest impression. Still, there are ways you can use words to connect.

Crack a one liner about your butterflies; everyone can relate to being nervous about public speaking. Share a story about yourself, provided it relates to (or transitions to) your points. Throw in references to your family, to reflect you’re trustworthy. And write like you’re having a casual conversation with a friend. You’re not preaching or selling. You’re just being you. On stage, you can be you at your best.

6) Repeat Yourself: We’ve all been there. When someone is speaking, we’ll drift off to a Caribbean beach or the Autobahn. Or, we’ll find ourselves lost and flustered when we can’t grasp a concept. Once you’ve fallen behind, it’s nearly impossible to pay attention. What’s the point?

In writing a speech, repetition is the key to leaving an impression. Hammer home key words, phrases, and themes. Always be looking for places to tie back and reinforce earlier points. And repeat critical points as if they were a musical refrain.

As a teenager, my coach continuously reminded us that “nothing good happens after midnight.” He’d lecture us on the dangers of partying, fighting, peer pressure, and quitting. After a while, my teammates and I just rolled our eyes. Eventually, we encountered those temptations. When I’d consider giving in, coach would growl “Schmitty” disapprovingly in my head. Despite my resistance, coach had found a way to get me to college unscathed. He simply repeated his message over-and-over until it stuck.

Some audience members may get annoyed when you repeat yourself. But don’t worry how they feel today. Concern yourself with this question: What will they remember six months from now?
7) Use Transitions: Sometimes, audiences won’t recognize what’s important. That’s why you use transitional phrases to signal intent. For example, take a rhetorical question like “What does this mean” – and follow it with a pause. Silence gets attention – and this tactic creates anticipation (along with awakening those who’ve drifted off). Similarly, a phrase like “So here’s the lesson” also captures an audience’s interest. It alerts them that something important is about to be shared. Even if they weren’t paying attention before, they can tune in now and catch up.

8) Include Theatrics: During his workshops, Dr. Stephen Covey would fill a glass bowl nearly full with sand. From there, he’d ask a volunteer to place rocks into the bowl. In the exercise, rocks represented essentials like family, job, worship, and exercise, while the bowl signified the volunteer’s time and energy. It never failed: The volunteer couldn’t fit every rock in the bowl. The sand – which embodied day-to-day activities like transporting children, shopping, or reading – took up too much space. Something had to be cut. Usually, it was something essential.

Covey would then encourage his volunteer to consider another option: Start with placing a rock in the bowl, adding some sand, and then alternating rocks and sand until the bowl was full. Like magic, there was suddenly enough space for both, as the sand gradually filled any gaps between the rocks. The message: Maintain balance. Never lose sight of the essentials as you tend to the day-to-day (and vice versa).

Of course, Covey could’ve made his point verbally and moved on. Instead, he illustrated it with household items in a way his audience wouldn’t soon forget. If you have a smaller audience (or a video screen), consider incorporating visuals. Keep the props, storyline, and lesson simple. When you’re done, leave everything out to symbolize your point to your audience. Whatever you do, don’t play it safe. If you do, your speech will be forgotten in no time.

9) End Strong: In 2004, I attended a Direct Marketing Association (DMA) conference. I don’t recall much about our keynote speaker, except that he was tall and southern. I can’t even remember what his address was about. But I’ll never forget the story he used to close his speech.

The speaker was a friend of Jerry Richardson, owner of the NFL’s Carolina Panthers. A few years earlier, the Panthers had drafted a fiery wide receiver named Steve Smith. While Smith excelled on the field, he was a nightmare in the locker room. Eventually, Smith was arrested for assaulting a teammate during film study.
Already reeling from bad publicity from other player incidents, Richardson was pressured to cut Smith. But he chose a different path. Richardson vowed to spend more time with Smith. He decided that Smith would be better served with guidance and caring than further punishment. Eventually, Richardson’s patience paid off. Smith became the Panthers’ all-time leading receiver – and scored a touchdown in their only Super Bowl appearance. In fact, Smith still plays for the Panthers to this day.

If the speaker intended to remind me how powerful that personal attention and forgiveness could be, he succeeded in spades. Fact is, your close is what your audience will remember. So recap your biggest takeaway. Tie everything together. Share a success story. Make a call to action. Don’t hold anything back. Your ending is what audience will ultimately talk about when they head out the door.

10) Keep it Short: What is the worst sin of public speaking? It’s trying to do too much! Your audience’s attention will naturally wane after a few minutes. They have other places to be – and don’t want to be held hostage. And the longer you stay on stage, the more likely you are to stray and make mistakes. So make your points and sit down. Never forget: This is their time, not yours.

 

Source Jeff Schmitt – Forbes.com 

http://onforb.es/PsOlcn

3 Ways to Get More Business Donations & Raise More Money

shutterstock_94784032

Many national companies prefer to use a single point of contact to help streamline their donation
request fulfillment process. Clearinghouses fulfill this function by helping match schools and
nonprofit organizations with businesses that want to help.

Most clearinghouses offer both a free service platform and a paid one. My suggestion is to try
the free platform and see if you like it.

If you do, then it’s well worth the extra fee to use the paid platform. Why? Because it provides
even more business donation matches for your group and therefore helps you raise a lot more
money.

The best one – and the easiest to use – is called Donation Match.
Donation Match – Find hundreds of donated items for fundraising auctions, raffles, gift bags, or
giveaways with just a few clicks. Use their custom application to reach multiple companies and
brands who value your event audiences, all in one place. This is as easy peasy at it gets!

Bidding For Good – Primarily does online auctions for nonprofit groups, but also has donated
items from businesses that they can add to your auction. This is an easy way to raise money
online as long as you have enough active supporters willing to make enough bids online.

Good360 – This is a good source for surplus products from businesses. NOTE: These product
donations cannot be auctioned off to raise funds. These products also cannot be sold, traded or
bartered or be given as gifts to volunteers or sold in thrift shops. All product donations MUST be
given to the needy, ill, and youth that you serve in your community. Groups must also pay
administrative fees and shipping charges.

How To become a FUNDRAISING guru in 8 steps

How-To-Raise-Money

Everyone needs a helping hand sometimes. And no matter how deep their pockets are, most people have been faced with a situation where they’ve had to raise a large sum of funds before. If you’ve ever had to do it, you know that sorting out how to raise money as well as the fundraising process is no walk in the park.

So for all you first-time fundraising organizers, or anyone who just feels lost or overwhelmed with figuring out how to raise money, we’ve come up with some steps to successful fundraising.

1. Define a goal
You don’t have to get carried away with setting a specific monetary goal, but it’s good to think about what you hope to achieve with your fundraiser. The main purpose of this is to give your potential donors a clear idea of where exactly their donations will be going. Setting a goal is also a good way to keep you focused and motivated in your fundraising efforts.

2. Know your options
The fundraising well is deep, friends. Depending on what your goal is, there are vast and varied ways to raise those necessary funds. To list just a few, there’s loans, grants, restaurant fundraisers, trust funds, nonprofit partnerships and online fundraising. It’s important to research all your options before starting your fundraiser, to be sure the method you’ve chosen is really the best way to reach your goal.

3. Choose a platform (or platforms)
Once you know all your options, you have to choose which platform is best suited to your needs. You can host your fundraiser either online or in person, with a whole trove of specific fundraising ideas in each category. We recommend using a combination of tactics to raise more money. Many of our most successful fundraisers combined both on- and offline efforts to maximize their reach and total money raised.

4. Organize your campaign
We know it seems like there are a million things to keep track of when you’re raising money. This is why we call our users “organizers” – it’s very important to stay organized when planning a fundraiser. Consider investing in a fundraising notebook to jot down ideas, keep track of donations, remind yourself of your final goal and schedule mini-goal deadlines.

5. Consult professional resources
The best way to get the most from your fundraising efforts is to consult a professional. GiveForward provides all our fundraising organizers with personal fundraising coaches, who have advice on anything from how to maximize views for fundraising pages to how to most securely get money to the beneficiary.

6. Enlist a team
Just to hammer home the benefits of collaboration, we want to stress how important it is to have help when you fundraise. By now you’ve gotten the point that fundraising is a lot of work. Building a team of co-organizers can help you smooth out the rough edges of your fundraiser. Studies have even proven that a fundraiser has better chances of success if organized by a team. For example, a GiveForward fundraiser with multiple organizers raises on average five times more money than one with a single organizer. There really is power in numbers.

7. Get word out
If a fundraiser falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? …We think it’s probably better not to leave this one to chance. So after you’ve planned out your fundraiser, either online or in person, you have to advertise. Share your fundraising page on social media, through email and by word of mouth. Contact your local newspaper to see if you can advertise and get media coverage. Solicit help from local businesses – sometimes they’re willing to donate or help organize fundraising events. The more visible your fundraiser is, the more donations you’ll receive.

8. Show your appreciation
This seems apparent, but it really is very important to remember to show gratitude to your donors. The fact that people chose to give their hard-earned money to help you reach your goal, when they certainly didn’t have to, is incredible. So give back! Simple, personalized thank you letters are an easy way to show your appreciation and strengthen those relationships with your donors.

The bottom line
The most important thing to remember when navigating the challenge of how to raise money online is that it’s okay to ask for help – including initially asking for donations and also organizing a fundraiser. The beauty of fundraisers is seeing people come together to help reach a common goal – and with a little help that goal doesn’t have to be hard to reach.

Thanks to GIVE FORWARD for this original post. View at http://bit.ly/1qYkuU5

Why Some Fundraisers Succeed While Others Fail

why-some-fundraisers-succeed

This guest article by multimillionaire nonprofit benefactor Paul J. Meyer describes the qualities possessed by successful fundraisers and contrasts those with the qualities exhibited by the unsuccessful fundraisers.

Paul is not just describing his own experience as a nonprofit donor. He took the time to personally interview 30 other major donors to find the common qualities possessed by a successful major gift fundraiser.

From the Donor’s Perspective: Why Some Fundraisers Succeed While Others Fail

Author: Paul J. Meyer

In order to get their valuable perspectives on fundraising, I interviewed more than 30 donors of the highest caliber who have given millions and millions of dollars to various charities, ministries, and organizations. I asked them why some fundraisers succeed while others fail.

These are the qualities and characteristics the donors felt made successful fundraisers:

Sincere relationship — Above all, successful fundraisers are sincere.

Personal integrity — Successful fundraisers are upfront, genuine, and always operate with integrity.

Knowledge of their charity — Successful fundraisers are well informed.

Clearly defined goals — Successful fundraisers clearly state the mission, needs, and opportunity a donor has to help accomplish the mission.

Regular communication — Successful fundraisers keep donors in the loop.

Assurance of cost effectiveness — Successful fundraisers show donors that their money is doing what was promised.

Credibility — Successful fundraisers use donors’ funds for the intended purpose only.

Matching gifts — Successful fundraisers think about lead gifts or matching gifts so donors’ gifts are multiplied.

Deserving cause — Successful fundraisers help donors feel that they are making a worthwhile contribution to a worthwhile cause.

Shared vision — Successful fundraisers seek donors who share the organization’s vision and want to make a difference.

Passion — Successful fundraisers believe in their cause so much that they contribute to it themselves.

Common interest — Successful fundraisers find donors who are interested in their mission.

Enthusiasm — Successful fundraisers are enthusiastic about their cause.

Quality presentation — Successful fundraisers present the charity in an enticing, concise, and articulate manner.

Gratitude — Successful fundraisers must have an air of gratitude, no matter the amount of the gift.

Persistence — Successful fundraisers are persistent without being offensive.

Negative Qualities Of Unsuccessful Fundraisers

On the other hand, these are the qualities and characteristics the donors felt made fundraisers fail:

Lack of personal relationship — One of the most common reasons that fundraisers fail is that they haven’t established a relationship with the donor.

Negative characteristics portrayed — If something is said or done that runs up the “red flag” for the donor, the fundraiser will most likely fail.

Lack of sincerity and belief — Failure comes when fundraisers are not sincere and do not have a strong belief in their charity.

Poor communication — Failure is imminent for fundraisers who do not communicate, including communicating about the charity and keeping in touch with the donor.

Lack of clear goals — Fundraising without clear goals leads to lack of balance and action.

Lack of integrity — Any hint of a fundraiser’s lack of integrity, and the donor will slow down, back up, or demand answers.

Perceived ungratefulness — Fundraisers who fail rarely give donors a personal thank-you for their gift or else they use it as a steppingstone to the next request.

Desperation letters — Desperation letters are not effective, well received, or quickly forgotten.

Pressure selling — High-pressure salesmanship is a serious turnoff.

Lack of knowledge — Fundraisers fail because they cannot answer the questions that donors ask.

Inaction — Many fundraisers fail because they are not getting the message out to enough people.

Wastefulness — Fundraisers fail when they do not spend the donors’ money wisely.

Lack of interest — Fundraisers who fail seldom do the homework necessary to know if the prospective donor is even interested in the charity.

Inappropriate appreciation — Unsuccessful fundraisers don’t take the time or care to find out how their donors expect to be appreciated.

Forgetting the obvious — If a fundraiser does not leave a donor with all the necessary contact information, the donor cannot give.

Wasting time — Prospective donors do not appreciate when fundraisers are insensitive to their time and schedule.

Having a donor’s perspective can help make the difference between success and failure as a fundraiser!

About the Author
Paul J. Meyer is a New York Times best-selling author, successful entrepreneur, and a millionaire many times over. His life-long passion is helping people develop their full potential in business and leadership through tried and true methods of achieving success. Visit www.pauljmeyer.com for more resources. Article via http://www.fundraiserhelp.com

 

Want to start a friendly bidding war among your guests?

Reno-Vip-Service

Signed music or sports memorabilia, including autographed footballs, baseball shirts or other equipment from your region’s favorite team, is guaranteed to attract top bidders, raising 370%-630% of their FMV. Also popular are tickets to local sporting events. You’ll always find a couple of fans willing to bid high to support their team, particularly star players.

Fine dining restaurants, such as steak houses or celebrity establishments appeared numerous times making 330%-460% of their FMV. Happily, restaurant certificates are generally easy to come by, as restaurant owners enjoy the promotion they receive by being included in a charity auction.

Following the dining theme above, luxury kitchenware like a high-end knife collection or the latest coffee maker, inspire those looking to find a practical deal for their home.

Fashion is always a good category to include in any auction. High-end items from designer favorites like Tory Burch, Diane von Furstenburg, Michael Kors or Ralph Lauren, do very well, especially during our Fall events as we move into the holiday season. Handbags, shopping certificates and accessories are among the most highly sought fashion items.

Travel; whether a pair of airline tickets or a weekend stay at a Disney resort always generates excitement, with our top item this year, a weekend in New York City selling for 460% of the item’s FMV. Guests are just as happy to bid on a domestic trip over an international one, as there is less paperwork and organization involved, so concentrate your volunteer’s search efforts at home.

Unique experience packages. VIP seating box access at a concert, an opportunity to drive your dream car, or a private tour of the Coca Cola factory, are some examples of experiences we’ve seen do really well this year. For something truly special reach out to well-connected board members or spend time brainstorming with your volunteer committee to see what unique relationships they may have. Be sure to promote these big impact items before the event (our online pre-bidding package makes this easy) and encourage your auction volunteers to point them out to guests.

General rule; anything that is unique, one of a kind, or limited will do very well at your event. Initially, a donation from a high-end fashion house or a weekend stay at a luxury hotel may seem impossible to achieve, but check back with our blog soon for advice on the best way to achieve these items for your next auction.

 

Human centerpieces and performance art served up at gala.

MOCa Galal Centerpiece

How do you even begin to find the words to describe a museum gala for which each and every guest (Eli Broad, even) is required to wear a white lab coat, and at which the table centerpieces are live humans, and the dessert is an offering of edible body parts?

Epic. That’s what the Museum of Contemporary Art’s annual gala was on Saturday night. Titled “An Artist’s Life Manifesto,” the event was conceived by performance artist Marina Abramovic. And it managed to generate its share of controversy before it even got off the ground. The use of humans as centerpieces, which dancer Yvonne Rainer called “exploitative” and “a grotesque spectacle,” manifested itself, in part, in nude prone female bodies rotating in the center of several large round tables. (What was grotesque was that, as Abvramovic put it, she was “allowed” to use nude female bodies, but not male ones.)

Other tables had live human heads poking through. Cards at each place setting instructed guests to “look but don’t touch” the performers. “The centerpiece will observe you. You may observe the centerpiece. No touching, feeding, offering drink, or disrespecting the centerpiece. All communication and connection with the centerpiece must be non-verbal.” And so on.

(If you think the performance art aspect was limited to the efforts of these performers alone, we suggest you try to eat a frisee salad while being silently judged by your centerpiece.) MOCA Gala1

The piece was designed to provoke and disturb, and it worked.The lab coats, which everyone was asked to don on the way into the gala tent, were designed to make guests part of the experiment. They also leveled the fashion playing field — to interesting effect — and made some of the Hollywood pretties look like cast members straight out of “General Hospital.”

The event, which raised $2.5 million for the museum, culminated in a performance by Deborah Harry followed by the offering up of body parts for dessert — in the form of two life-size cakes that were perfect doppelgangers for Abramovic and Harry. After the two ladies plunged their steely knives into their confectionery doubles, reaching inside to rip out the “hearts,” waiters dismembered the toes, breasts, etc., and served them to guests. A surreal scene if ever there was one.

By way of introducing MOCA Director Jeffrey Deitch, Broad described the last two years at the museum as a “spectacular turnaround.” The museum’s endowment has doubled and attendance has tripled during Deitch’s tenure, Broad, a MOCA trustee, said.

Deitch called Abramovic “the most influential performance artist working today.”

When the artist took the stage, she said, “it has not been easy to force you all into lab coats. But I like the idea of transformation.” She thanked the 120 performance artists participating in the evening’s work, some of whom had to hold their position and concentration for four hours.

Gov. Jerry Brown and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa were among the high-profile guests. From the art world, Doug Aiken, Ed Ruscha, Kenneth Anger and Mark Bradford were there. Hollywood types included Liz Goldwyn, Dita von Teese, Kirsten Dunst, Gwen Stefani, Will Ferrell and Nicole Richie. There were plenty of fashion folks too — Monique Lhuillier, Jeremy Scott, Chrome Hearts’ Richard and Laurie Stark, Pamela Skaist-Levy and Gela Nash-Taylor, and Cameron Silver. Hedi Slimane was in the house as well. The designer-turned-photographer opened an exhibition at the museum’s Pacific Design Center space on Friday, titled “California Song.”

Before the lab coats went on, some spectacular outfits made a quick appearance. Von Teese was in a Jean Paul Gaultier gown (she had just accompanied the designer to the opening of his retrospective at the Dallas Museum of Art). The artist Rosson Crow was in a fit ‘n’ flare vintage Don Loper gown, and Gelila Puck had her hair in a 1920s coif, in the spirit of her flapper-esque hand-painted James Galanos gown. Scott no doubt was wearing one of his own designs — a gold tuxedo vest sans shirt — and Lisa Eisner had on a festive full skirt trimmed in fur. Wanda McDaniel was representing for her boss, wearing a fun dress with Giorgio Armani’s face on the front.

The white lab coats might have made it hard to see the fashion statements, but they made a statement themselves. As the lab-coated people decamped to the valet line, we wondered aloud about one more piece of performance art.

We’d all make one heck of a flash mob at the local emergency room.

Article via LA Times– Booth Moore and Adam Tschorn

Photos: At top, one of the several tables at the MOCA gala’s “An Artist’s Life Manifesto,” directed by Marina Abramovic on Nov. 12, 2011. At middle, left, Will Ferrell and Monique Lhuiller at the MOCA gala. Credit: Both by Frazer Harrison / Getty Images for MOCA. At right, Deborah Harry performs while being carried onto the stage at the MOCA gala. Credit: John Sciulli / Getty Images for MOCA.

 

Success Secrets of an Auctioneer – One Bid Board

Untitled

Restaurant certificates are the foundation of every successful fundraising auction and nonprofit auctions are a great advertising opportunity for creating visibility and brand identity.

What is the One Bid Board?
The One Bid Board is a physical display featuring restaurant certificates at face value. Bidders compete for the right to be the first to win. The dining certificate remains on display and bidders continue to view restaurants name, logo and location for the duration of the auction.

What are the benefits for a restaurant?
• Restaurant logo and location is visible all 300 minutes of the event
• Sales are immediate and in full view of the buying audience
• Multiple bidders can view donation and bid simultaneously
• Display is upright & moves with the audience

What are the benefits for the organization?
• Board preparation is quick and easy and portable
• Reconciliation is simple
• Only one volunteer needed to prepare and manage board
• Board can be created well in advance of the auction
• Lightweight & collapsible for easy transportation

One Bid Board certificate advantages:
• Easy to administer
• Broad audience appeal
• Redemption rate 60%
• Cost effective
• Has lasting impact
• Creates new customers
• Creates immediate sales
• Hours of advertising
• Multiple bidders can write in bid number and win simultaneously
• Simple volunteer and clerking procedure
• Advance preparation quick and easy
• Uses upright portable display, easy transport, move about the venue

How does it work?
The One Bid Board is positioned in front of auction guests during the silent auction. A volunteer hosts the board informing bidders of the restaurants on the board and recording bid numbers. The auctioneer calls out the featured restaurants and announces each one as it sells. The board is moved to where the action is until all restaurants have sold. If restaurants are still available post auction, position the board near the check-out area for further viewing and sales.

Father’s Day – A Poem to My Hero

01bef0c2e9113a1de782863977e91fcf

The world always needs a hero, that hero is dad.

Fathers are wonderful people
Too little understood,
And we do not sing their praises
As often as we should…

For, somehow, Father seems to be
The man who pays the bills,
While Mother binds up little hurts
And nurses all our ills…

And Father struggles daily
To live up to “HIS IMAGE”
As protector and provider
And “hero or the scrimmage”…

And perhaps that is the reason
We sometimes get the notion,
That Fathers are not subject
To the thing we call emotion,

But if you look inside Dad’s heart,
Where no one else can see
You’ll find he’s sentimental
And as “soft” as he can be…

But he’s so busy every day
In the grueling race of life,
He leaves the sentimental stuff
To his partner and his wife…

But Fathers are just WONDERFUL
In a million different ways,
And they merit loving compliments
And accolade of praise,

For the only reason Dad aspires
To fortune and success
Is to make the family proud of him
And to bring them happiness…

And like OUR HEAVENLY FATHER,
He’s a guardian and a guide,
Someone that we can count on
To be ALWAYS ON OUR SIDE.
Helen Steiner Rice

How Often Should You Thank Recurring Donors?

thank-you-road-sign

People often ask, is it important to thank a recurring donor every month?  The answer depends on how they gave in the first place.

When the Recurring Donation Comes Through Offline Methods.

When someone becomes a recurring donor offline, say through direct mail, telemarketing, face to face, TV, or any other ‘offline’ medium, Ialways recommend sending an immediate snail mail thank you letter for joining but then after that NOT to send .donors monthly thank you letters.

It costs money to send a thank you via snail mail which defeats the purpose of having someone join as a recurring donor. However, you should send a tax receipt in January of all their gifts, so they have it for their records and, of course, you should always thank the donors in your annual appeals, recognizing them as special.

Online Recurring Donor Receipts: Make them Personal and Special

For online credit card recurring donors, where a monthly thank you email is typically generated automatically, I recommend something slightly different.

Definitely send a snail mail letter to thank the donor for joining the recurring giving program andsend the tax receipt via snail mail (and email) in January.

But you’ll also have to make an extra effort to alternate the monthly thank you receipts. You’re certainly not treating these donors special if you keep sending the same standard thank you month after month. These donors are making a considerable ongoing contribution to your organization so you should treat them special.

While I like PayPal and Network for Good a lot for their ease of use in having donors join a recurring giving program, their email receipts are not great. In the “off the shelf” versions of these services your org can’t change the messages, although customization is available in Network for Good’s Donate Now option.   Just take a look at these automatically generated receipts:

PayPal

You sent an automatic payment

Hello e waasdorp,

You sent an automatice payment to Marstons Mills Public Library, Inc. Here are the details:

Amount: $5.00

To: Marston Mills Public Library, Inc

For:

Customer service URL: http://www.xxxxx

Customer service email: smartn@xxxxxx.org

Customer service phone: xxx-xxx-xxxx

Automatic payment details:

And here’s a Network For Good example

From: donations@networkforgood.org

Date: May 21, 2014 at 6:23:51 AM MST
To: xxxx

Subject: Thank you for your donation!

The following donation(s) were scheduled to be processed today per instructions from pledge(s) you’ve made in the past.

Nonprofit Organization: NAME
Frequency: Monthly

On behalf of your favorite charity(ies), we thank you for your generous support! By making an automated donation online through Network for Good, you have chosen one of the most efficient and cost effective ways to give to charity.

Your contribution is tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. You may save or print this receipt for your records and the information will be conveniently stored in your donation history for you to access at any time.  This email certifies that you have made this donation as a charitable contribution and you are not receiving any goods or services in return.  This receipt may be useful to you when completing your tax return.

Your credit card will be billed as Network for Good instead of the names of the organizations receiving the funds because your donation is to the Network for Good Donor Advised Fund (tax ID 68-0480736), which will re-grant your donation to the charity/ies you designated.  All donations are final and may not be refunded. Your donation has been processed as follows:

Name: xxx

Address: xxxx
City: xxxx
State/Province: xx
Zip/Postal Code: xxx

E-mail: xxx
Phone: xxx

Total Donation Amount: $10.50

Method of Payment: Visa
Name on Credit Card: xx

Credit Card Last 4 Digits: xxxx
Date: Wednesday, May 21, 2014
Time: 9:23 AM EDT
Reference Number: xxxxxxxxxxx

These have been abbreviated here, but they both continue in this dry legalistic way. And this  ‘standard approach’ does not apply to just PayPal or Network for Good receipts. We can certainly explain why these two are just not able to make it any more personal because it’s not the organization issuing them, they’re just the ‘middle man’ if you will. The sad news is that I have seen even several large organizations with other credit card processing systems where the email receipts are not very good either when they could be much better.

Do the above email receipts seem special to you? Do they tell the donor about the impact their gift is making? Absolutely not. A receipt is not a thank you.

How to Make a Better Impression

But, there is a simple solution that does not take that much time or extra resources, and it WILL make a world of difference to the recurring donor you’re trying to keep and in the future upgrade to higher levels.

If all is well, you should have already coded these recurring donors in your email list as a special segment. If not, start doing this as soon as possible! You’ll benefit from it in the short and long run!

Here is a simple recommendation to address the issue of recurring donor receipts that does not take that much time:

1. Create a special variation of your email newsletter to include a thank you to your recurring donor

I trust that you’re sending out an email newsletter or message to your donors at least once a month. If so, I recommend creating a slight variation of the email introduction that simply says:

Thank you for being such a great member of the Circle of Friends (fill in name of your monthly giving group). You make a difference to the many people (animals) etc. we serve (fill in specifics)… Thanks to you we’re able to have the funds to…    (fill in specifics).

Then go into the rest of your email blast announcing upcoming events and activities… or better yet tell the story about one of your clients. Do not repeat the amount and date of their gift in this email but focus on the fact that they are such a loyal donor to your organization and they’re truly SPECIAL! You should be able to do this in the first few lines of your email newsletter.

This way, it gives the recurring donor that ‘special feeling.’  It’s not a lot of extra work on your part and it’s also less important at what time of the month you send that email. And believe it or not, you can occasionally even include an ask for money in some of those email blasts (but do fit it in with your overall communication strategy! If you’re already in the mail heavily, you may just use those email blasts as reminders.

The long and short of it is, you just told the recurring donor how special they are to your organization and the difference their ongoing gifts make. And, if you get feedback and testimonials from your recurring donors, don’t be afraid to use them. People love hearing from other donors confirming that they made the right decision (joining your recurring giving program)!

2. Send at least four special email thank yous at a minimum

If you are not yet sending a regular email newsletter now, I highly recommend you do at least four special email blast thank you emails to your recurring donors annually. They don’t have to be very long or elaborate, just personal and really appreciative. Many organizations tend to change up their typical snail mail thank you letters once a quarter, depending upon their annual fund schedule, so just make a simple email variation, work in the reference to being a recurring donor et voila!

I’m all for keeping things simple and manageable, so try to use what you already have in place and make small tweaks to accommodate the recurring donors. It is important to treat this special group special. You’ll continue to benefit from these recurring donors, month after month, for many years to come!

And, if you have questions or special email thank you notes to share, please feel free to email them to erica@adirectsolution.com.

Original article by Erica Waasdorp. She is the author of the hot new book, Monthly Giving: The Sleeping Giant. 

Getting Media Coverage

media_int

When non-profit organizations aren’t out changing the world, they’re appealing to supporters and the public for donations. Fundraising is a constant challenge for non-profit organizations and it’s not because people don’t want to give the money –it’s because people don’t always know that there’s a need. That changes by getting media coverage.

 

Fundraising efforts include direct mailings, advertising, and marketing campaigns. Each of these is costly and there’s no way to guarantee return on investment. Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to gain exposure and elicit donations without having to dip into the coffers? You can –they’re called “editorial placements” or as we in media relations like to say “free advertising”.

Newspapers and magazines live and die by their content. If people don’t want to read what they’re printing, they’re in trouble. Being able to offer a print publication (or even a broadcast network) with a story that will entertain, educate, or inspires its readers is a challenge, but well worth it if it’s printed.

Which of the following newspaper placements do you think will garner more public response: an ad placed in the “weekender”or “volunteer opportunity”sections describing your organization and asking for donations; or a touching feature story about how the organization is making a difference in the community?

The feature story will almost undoubtedly send more people to an organization’s Web site than an ad, and the funny this is that the feature story cost the organization nothing to secure.

Why does the public respond more strongly to a feature than an ad?

Because appearing in the media provides instant legitimization. People tend to trust the organizations or people they see in the paper or on TV.

If you run a non-profit animal shelter that is featured on the weekend nightly news’adopt-a-pet segment, chances are the public will think of you first when looking to adopt a pet as opposed to if you simply placed an ad in the Sunday paper every week.

So how do you obtain “free advertising?”By reaching out to the media every chance you get. Smaller organizations that utilize community support can offer personal feature stories on certain overachieving volunteers.

The media loves a good “feel good”story: how one volunteer has made such a difference, how a beneficiary of the organization’s services is thriving now, and so on.

How did your organization start? Did someone sell their business to establish a women’s shelter? Does a local mother care for homeless animals on her farm?

Publicity ideas

Here are some ideas to help inspire you to develop a story for your organization or cause.

 

Every person has a story. Discover the stories behind the people in your organization and make the media aware of them. By “story,”I mean a simple, conversational story –the type you might tell a friend.

Pitching a story to the media doesn’t mean you have to write it and offer it in its entirety. When you pitch a story, you simply let your media contact know about it. They’ll decide if it’s a fit and pursue it further.

To get an idea of the kinds of stories the paper and local networks like, spend a few weeks tuning in or scanning the pages. It will be obvious the kinds of things they’re looking for.

Pay close attention to the journalists and reporters who write on topics related to yours. These are the people you are going to want to contact with your story.

Local outlets want local stories, and this can represent multiple opportunities for media coverage. For instance, if the person your story focuses on lives in a town other than where your organization is based, you can pitch the story to both locales.

Let the world know what’s happening. Hosting or sponsoring an event can garner more attention than a two-line announcement in the calendar section.

What is the story surrounding your event? If you’re launching a clothing drive for professional attire to help women get jobs, highlight a success story, such as a woman associated with your organization who overcame hardships and landed a great job that changed her life.

If you’re hosting a casual fun-day dog show for kids to benefit a local animal shelter, find a pet owner who plans to enter his or her adopted shelter dog.

Even your fundraising events can be promoted through editorial placements. You don’t have to have a high-profile MC or a gala to make the news. If this is an annual event, how do you expect to surpass last year’s donations? How were the funds used? If they built a library or added a wing to a senior center, what’s the story behind that?

Announce Everything

Organizations in large cities face direct competition for donations and media coverage. To help improve your chances of media attention, do everything you can to stay in the news (or at least in the minds of the news writers in your area).

 

Is there a staffing change or new hire (a positive one)? Announce it. If you’ve added a service to your organization, announce it. In sales and marketing, a consumer needs to hear about a product seven times before he or she will buy it, on average.

The same is true for donations to non-profits. The more often the public sees your organization in print or hears about it on the radio or on television, the more likely they will be to consider donating. Keep that in mind the next time you’ve got news to share!

Media relations is about building relationships and having an idea of what the public wants. It’s not as complicated as it may seem, after all, you are the public.

What do you want to read? What would be interesting to you? Talk to your co-workers and friends and find out their opinions.

Identify the media people in your area who cover the types of things you and your organization do and begin to build a relationship. Before you know it, you may have them calling you for a story.